Politecnico di Torino - Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY

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BLOWBALL- FOR DRUGS ON THE WAY TO THE LUNGS

Drug Delivery SystemsDry Powder InhalerLipid Nanoparticle AssembliesMacrophage TargetingPulmonary Route

Introduction

All the antibiotics available on the market for pulmonary administration are addressed to the upper respiratory tract. In some infectious and cancerous diseases, the alveolar area has to be reached. BlowBall Drug Delivery System (DDS) aims to interact with mannose receptors (MR) on alveolar macrophages (AM) for a more efficient and sustainable treatment of lower airway infections involving AM

Technical features

The BlowBall technology forecasts the development of DDS that deliver the drug in the alveolar region and allows it to target the macrophage by MR bond. The delivery of drugs by BlowBall technology has prerequisites for solving the drawbacks of current therapy. Oral or parenteral administration of drugs addressed to AM is based on high and frequent dosages to maintain the therapeutic concentration in infection site and may lead to therapy failure due to poor adherence to administration schedules, side-effects, and drug resistance. The main innovative features of BlowBall consist in: newly synthesized molecules for DDS surface decoration that recognise AM receptor; a technology using biocompatible biomaterials suitable for DPI formulations avoiding cryoprotectants; an easily scalable green-process production.

Possible Applications

  • Treatment of lower airway infections involving AM such as M. tuberculosis, S. pneumonia, S. aureus, Y. pestis, C. albicans, P. carinii, C. neoformans, HIV, flu virus, dengue virus, Leishmania;
  • Treatment of macrophage-associated cancers.

Advantages

  • Inhalation therapy for pulmonary diseases as a more convenient alternative to the current therapy;
  • Combination of respirable properties with ability to transport the drug into alveolar macrophages;
  • Release of the drug directly at the site of infection with a rapid onset of pharmacological activity.